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Barry Gibb – My Favourite Vinyl

We asked the Bee Gees icon Barry Gibb to dig through his song catalogue and reveal which of his classic hits mean the most to him…

Heartbreaker –  1979


“Funnily enough, Dionne Warwick didn’t like Heartbreaker when we first played it to her. She told me, ‘this song doesn’t get me off’.
I diplomatically said, ‘why don’t you do it anyway, and we can always toss it away if you dont like it?’. You have to be pateient in the studio sometimes and this one paid off.”

I Just Want To Be Your Everything – 1977


“This was our young brother Andy’s first No. 1. We never selected who should sing what in the old days, there was no sense of competition, Robin would sing one or I did. The sense of competition came when we had success.
That’s when everyone in the group wanted a bit of individual attention. But this one felt right for Andy and we loved hearing him sing it.”

Barry Gibb – Shadows – 2016


“This is a new one, it’s my Roy Orbison song, the constant drive upwards, like he did with Crying, which I consider to be the greatest pop song ever.
The shadows are looking through his eyes, but I also suppose it’s me reflecting on the idea that I still see my brothers when they aren’t there.”

Islands In The Stream – 1983


“It’s probably his biggest hit but Kenny Rogers stills says to me, ‘I dont understand what Islands In The Stream is all about’. It’s about a No. 1 record, Kenny, get over it! My brothers wanted us to record this one but it was at a time when nobody wanted to hear our music.
I figured we should become songwriters because the most important thing to me was the that the songs got heard.”

Love You Inside Out – 1979


“This was our sixth consecutive No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and very special moment. It was Michael Jackson’s favourite song [of ours], we became friends through that song.”

Tragedy – 1979


“This song has a life all of its own. We have quite a few songs worthy of closing a live set but nothing quite beats Tragedy. It was a big compliment when Steps recorded it years later but I never learned their dance steps.”

Words – 1968


“I always love it when people tell me how they fell in love to a certain song of ours and Words is one of those. It was wonderful when Boyzone revived it.”

Emotion – 1977


“Samantha Sang did a great job with this and Destiny’s Child had a huge hit too, years later. I still havent met Beyoncé, my daughter went to see her live. I would love to write a song for her but I’ll wait for the day she asks for it.
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the story behind the song NY Mining Disaster 1941

Music History #8: "New York Mining Disaster 1941"By Bill De Main september 2012
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“New York Mining Disaster 1941 (Have You Seen My Wife, Mr. Jones)”
Written by Barry and Robin Gibb (1967)
Performed by Bee Gees


The MusicWhen the Bee Gees debut US single was released in April 1967, a lot of people thought it was The Beatles masquerading as another band. Even the name Bee Gees was read as code for “Beatles Group.” But within a year, brothers Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb established themselves not only as hit makers in their own right, but as chart rivals to the Fabs. “New York Mining Disaster 1941,” the first of thirty-some hits, is one of those rare pop songs in which the title never appears in the lyrics. Most people still refer to it by its subtitle “Have you seen my wife, Mr. Jones.” Inspired by the Aberfan mining disas…

Meaning of Songs

Clos
THE MEANING OF SONGSCollaborator:Stephan Koenig ALONE (1997) BARRY GIBB: What the song's really about is that little child inside. It's that abstract feeling we all have that no matter how close or how many relatives we have or how many people around us we love, we still feel alone. There's an aloneness about all of us. That "How do I, why is it always end up alone?" Well, I'm not alone, but I might feel alone, that no one really thinks the way I do. I guess that's because everybody's unique in their own way. We all do feel the same way about most things, but why is it that nobody feels the same way I do about everything? So you're alone. You have that feeling sometimes.

BARKER OF THE UFO (1967)
MAURICE GIBB: Always with experimentation in mind, this was a fun time. The memories of this session will always be remembered. I loved the tuba and reverse cymbal effect.

BLUE ISLAND (1993)
BARRY GIBB: The other side…